Schapendoes

Schapendoes

Schapendoes are one of the rarest dog breeds in the world. To get this breed of dog, you need to do it from a certified kennel.

Description

– Male dogs of this breed can be 43 to 50 centimeters tall.
– Female dogs of this breed can be 40 to 47 centimeters tall.
– Male dogs of this breed can weigh up to 15 kg.
– Female dogs of this breed can weigh up to 13 kg.
– The lifespan of these dogs can be from 12 to 15 years.

The Schapendoes breed has double fur. The outer layer is long, dry, and wavy, while the inner layer is thin and soft. All colors are allowed, but the most common is gray to black.

Temperament

Like all other breeds, the Schapendoes breed requires regular training in order to expend excess energy. It is advisable to let him run freely and unconnected and play for at least an hour a day. If you provide him with a certain amount of training, he will behave very calmly and relaxed. Most of the Schapendoes breed enjoys playing, swimming, and finding lost items.

Health

The Shapendos breed is a healthy breed of dog and has no health problems. Occasionally there may be a problem with hip dysplasia.

Care

Shapendos do not require excessive fur care but require twice a week brushing to avoid tangling. When you’re done with your fur, keep your ears clean, but don’t use cotton swabs. It is perfectly normal for hair to cover his eyes and in no case should you use a Venetian hair holder or cut the hair that falls over the eyes. Check your eyes regularly for dirt or loose hair.

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Feeding

Shapendos adore vitamin food and foods rich in protein and minerals. Meat products love turkey, lamb, and chicken.

Puppies

Puppies of the Shapendos breed should initially be fed high-quality dog food to gain immunity. This means that they need to gain immunity while they are still malignant.

History

Schapendoes come from a farm and dog herd in the province of Drenthe in the Netherlands and in Veuve. They were local dogs tailored to the needs of the people, the environment, and the needs of the work.

This breed of dog was lost almost during World War II, and the modern breed of these dogs comes from survivors. Dutch club Raad van Becher recognized the breed in 1952, and the first standard was written in 1954.

The breed was also recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale in 1971 as the No. 313 breed in Group 1, Part 1. Made in North America, the breed is recognized by the Canadian Club Kennel and the United Club Kennel in their respective Herding groups. The American club Kennel listed the Schapendoes as part of its Foundation for the Services of the Foundation.

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